UX, Funnel, Page Flow and Conversion Rate Optimization

Conversion Rate Optimization is the method of using analytics and user feedback to improve your websites’ performance. Conversion Rate Optimization is finding why visitors aren’t converting and fixing it.

Any Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO) strategy should begin with you putting yourself in your visitors’ shoes and looking closely at your site— specifically your Conversion Funnel.

What are the barriers standing in your visitors’ path to conversion? Here are some of the important areas you should look at:

  • Is it easy to trust your site?
  • Is your Call to Action clear and easy to find?
  • Are your Graphics relevant, well-placed, clean, and unique? Or are they distracting and overwhelming in number? Do you have a lot of unnecessary text?
  • Take a look at your site’s Usability. Can users easily search your site for what they’re looking for? How many pages and clicks does it take to complete the key conversions you’re measuring?

Contrary to popular belief, a website’s information architecture is not a mysterious, esoteric force that manifests itself during the UX design life cycle. Users actually do interact with aspects of a site’s information architecture. For example, when users move from link node to link node, they are engaging with what is known as the physical construct of a site’s information architecture.The practice of user experience design overlaps some aspect of every form of professional practice in the design and development of computing interfaces. User experience (UX), refers to the totality of visitors’ experience with your site — more than just how it looks, UX includes how easy your site is to use, how fast it is, and how easily visitors can complete whatever action they’re there to complete.

Carefully crafting your user experience, ensures the user stays on task and keeps moving through the funnel, having been given just enough information and options at each step. Projects usually begin with design briefs, branding standards, high-level project goals, as well as feature and functionality requirements. While certainly important, these documents leave the question, exactly how the website will fulfill the multiple user objectives (UX) unanswered.

By contrast, if you begin by looking at the goals of the user and the business, you can sketch out the various flows that need to be designed to meet both parties’ goals. When mapping out your user flows, start at the top—the point at which users first exposed to your site. You will probably want to address the flows that impact the most users first. Each user comes with his or her own needs, expectations, and level of knowledge, and they need to be treated so.

Make sure that your website design project makes use of sound principles of information architecture (IA) and user experience (UX) design. Ensure that you understand how users would want to navigate through a user interface.Begin by looking at the goals of the user and the business, and sketch out the various flows that need to be designed to meet both parties’ goals.

Focus on designing your user flow in a way that nudges the right visitor toward the must-have experience. Further, once that visitor converts, the UX should make it easy for them to tell their friends about their great experience via social media and other sharing, driving new users into the funnel.

It’s important to understand that converting every visitor isn’t optimal. Rather, focus on designing your user flow in a way that nudges the right visitor toward the must-have experience. Further, once that visitor converts, the UX should make it easy for them to tell their friends about their great experience via social media and other sharing, driving new users into the funnel.

Remember, a website that understands nothing about its users will have users who understand nothing about the site.

  • The success of your website hinges on your knowledge of the problems you are facing and where in the experience are the users disengaging. You need to steer users down a path (funnel) and predict what they are looking for. You can do so by learning how users have navigated your website to date, a metric called “page flow“.

Knowing how a user experiences your site is key to understanding why they aren’t reaching a certain goal. It is just as important, though, to understand why and how the ones who do make the final conversion get to that point.

Analyzing website performance in terms of how a page is expected to work can help you understand — and afterwards influence — customer behavior.Understanding whether a page is a routing page that is expected to provide navigation to other points, or a convincer page to get a visitor to do a specific task will allow you to actionably segment customer behavior.

You need to analyze your conversion rates and referral traffic to optimize page flow.How are users who come from Facebook hitting your conversion goal compared to those coming from Google? Do users from YouTube stay on website longer than anyone else, but then rarely sign up or buy? Does the verbiage in your banner ads drive more conversion than a tweet? And while customers are on site, what exactly are they looking at anyway? Where is there a bottleneck or sizable drop-off, and why?

The answers to these questions can be inferred from page flow analysis. This metric can decide how much money you put into specific marketing and advertising channels, for instance, or show you where you might need to redesign a page of your site or make certain language or buttons more prominent.

One of the most important metrics we follow at iEntrepreneur is the funnel path and page flows. Once we have our destination URLs set up, it is crucial to understand how people get there and how they maneuvered through the site. If we know the entrance points, we can focus on refining our message and engagement throughout the page flow process.

Knowing where users are entering and what they’re clicking when they get there is just as important to marketers as knowing when or why a customer makes a purchase or why they’re leaving the site. And that rings true for every site.

While many marketers think of conversion rate as the biggest indicator of whether efforts are successful, a metric like page flow supplies helpful hints on where we are succeeding or not succeeding in increasing the conversion rate.

  • Are your Search Engine Optimization efforts up-to-date, correct, and relevant? Are you using  the right titles, relevant keywords and proper meta data?

Images should have correct names, titles should be clear and descriptive, and keywords should be used properly. If these items are not relevant, people may be coming to your site looking for something you don’t offer, while those who seek your services are unable to find you.

Conversion is an incredibly powerful tool when used as a question prompt and not an answer. Generally, acquisition channels like non-brand pay-per-click will convert at a far lower rate than your site average. Seeking to improve those rates individually will save you far more money than treating it as part of a bigger overall conversion number. Separate out your channels, figure out which you can impact through conversion optimization, and focus on those instead of your headline conversion rate.

If your site has several key tasks (eg. sales, customer support, enquiries, leads, etc.) treat those as separate conversion tasks. Start with your most important pages & journeys, ask yourself what percentage of searches result in a click to a product page and what you can change about your search results to improve that?

Contact us Today to know how we can help you plan your user’s experience before you build your website.

Rohit Kuttappan

A genial, soft spoken and friendly professional, Rohit helps startups, small and medium enterprises in Punjab, Haryana and Delhi area to build a positive social reputation and have maximum conversion rate in online marketing by running effective campaigns in Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google , YouTube and high traffic websites. Rohit has been involved in the marketing efforts of a number of start-ups and have consulted and managed the social media campaign of some small and medium businesses. He is well experienced in digital marketing for education, hospitality and retail and realty verticals.

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